Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Success and Aversive Consequences as Determinants of Evaluative and Behavior Changes After D...

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Research Article

Success and Aversive Consequences as Determinants of Evaluative and Behavior Changes After Discrepant Role Playing

Author:

Herman Verhaeghe

Laboratorium voor Experimentale Sociale Psychologic Tiensestraat 102 3000 Leuven, BE
About Herman
Requests for reprints may be sent to Herman Verhaeghe, L.E.S.P., Katholieke Universiteit te Leuven, Tiensestraat, 102, 3000 Leuven, België.
X close

Abstract

Two studies were conducted to examine the behavior effects of discrepant role playing, and to test the proposition that the production of aversive consequences is necessary for the dissonance-predicted, inverse relationship between amount of inducement and subsequent evaluative change to be obtained. In the first experiment, subjects were enticed for either a low or high monetary incentive to advise three confederates to engage in a dull task for a considerable amount of time by asserting that the task is enjoyable. As expected, subjects evidenced the dissonance-predicted effect only when they were successful in convincing their colleagues. Subjects were also found to engage in the dull task for a longer time after performing a successful act of discrepant role playing. A second study was designed to assess the relative importance of success and aversive consequences in producing the dissonance-predicted effect. All subjects learned that they were successful in convincing their colleagues of the altitude-discrepant position, but for only half did the successful speech produce aversive consequences. The results clearly demonstrate that aversive consequences rather than success is the key determinant of dissonance-predicted evaluative changes. The data further indicate that discrepant role playing is not effective in producing attitude-related behavior change. The results are discussed in terms of dissonance theory, self-perception theory, and response contagion theory.
How to Cite: Verhaeghe, H., 1976. Success and Aversive Consequences as Determinants of Evaluative and Behavior Changes After Discrepant Role Playing. Psychologica Belgica, 16(2), pp.257–278. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/pb.597
1
Views
Published on 01 Jan 1976.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)

    comments powered by Disqus